OK-SAFE, Inc. Blog

July 7, 2011

Missing MOU now on U.S. State Dept. website

On January 19, 2011 the U.S. State Department announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) creating a U.S.-China Governors Forum.

While fact sheets and summaries were available, including photos of the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding, and press conferences were held announcing this document by State Dept. officials, the actual MOU was noticeably missing.

Numerous phone calls and requests for the missing document to State’s Special Representative Reta Jo Lewis’ office, the official announcing the MOU,  were unsuccessful.  OK-SAFE then made a request through Congressman John Sullivan’s office on June 28, 2011; two days later, a legislative assistant in Sullivan’s D.C. office provided a link to a pdf version of the missing MOU.  This link was provided to him by a contact in the State Department.

Wonder of wonders, this MOU is also now available on the State Department page with the other documents pertaining to the U.S. China Governors Forum. (It wasn’t there January – June of 2011 – interesting.)

Here’s a direct link to MOU in pdf format: http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/167499.pdf

The National Governors Association sponsored U.S.-China Governors forum is scheduled for July 15-17, 2011 in Salt Lake City, Utah and will be held at the 5-star Grand America Hotel.

The NGA event coincides with the U.S.-China 2011 Conference on Trade,Education, and Culture, to be held at the Little America Hotel, directly across the street from the NGA event, July 14-17, 2011.

Both events advertise pairing up of U.S. officials with Chinese counterparts. (See the OK-SAFE blog post entitled “Sleeping With the Enemy” for more details.)

Citizens in all states have been asked to contact their governor and ask whether they plan to attend either of these conferences and if so, just what their intentions are regarding foreign direct investment, or other types of partnerships with the Communist Chinese.

Advertisements

June 29, 2011

Office of the Historian – Researchers Dream

This goes under the category of “You learn something new everyday.”

It is safe to say that most researchers operate as a sort of combination detective/historian. They love the thrill of the hunt and don’t mind reading what would bore most other people to death. They want to know the facts about what, when, where, how, and why certain things happen. And who did it.

They seek source documents and love archives – whether the dusty boxed kind in poorly lit warehouses or the tidy electronic kind available in pdf format. Source documents and originals paperwork, necessary for sound research, is a thrill to get access to and better than ice cream.

Not having to pay for it is another.

Check out the Office of the Historian at the U.S. State Department website.  This site and it’s contents were discovered while studying the FOIA law on the State Dept. website.

(Digging into this State Dept. FOIA process was necessary because one of our document requests is getting nowhere.  It seems the State Dept. is having a hard time disclosing the actual Memorandum of Understanding Creating the U.S.-China Governors Forum, announced on January 19, 2011 by Sec. Clinton. This forum, sponsored by the National Governors Association and a Chinese group, is to meet in Salt Lake City, Utah on July 15-17, 2011 at the 5-star Grand American Hotel. For details on this event see the “Sleeping With the Enemy” post below.)

The Office of the Historian has lots of information, with one section called Foreign Relations of the United States, listing four administrations: the Kennedy Administration (includes pre-Kennedy documents); the Johnson Administration; and two Nixon-Ford administrations (the Nixon/Agnew/Ford years, and the Nixon/Ford/Rockefeller years.)

The Nixon-Ford eras are important because we are living with the results of having developed intimate relationships with what were the Communist bloc countries – the Soviet Union and the People’s Republic of China.  It is important to understand how the U.S. developed its current interdependency with the Chinese; this means one needs to understand Henry A. Kissinger, the man present before, during and after the Nixon-Ford years and instrumental in directing policy decisions regarding both the Soviet Union and “Red China”, as it is referred to in several of these archived documents.

Kissinger really liked the communists. And still does.

Click the link to historical Documents on Foreign Relations of the United States to see the four Administrations noted above.

Click Status of the Series to see new and upcoming additions:

Foreign Relations of the United States: Status of the Series

Volumes Published in 2011 (1)

  1. 1969–1976, Volume E–12, Documents on East and Southeast Asia, 1973–1976 (March 3)

Volumes Published in 2010 (6)

  1. 1969–1976, Volume XIX, Part 1, Korea, 1969–1972 (May 4)
  2. 1969–1976, Volume VIII, Vietnam, January–October 1972 (June 24)
  3. 1969–1976, Volume VII, Vietnam, July 1970–January 1972 (September 8)
  4. 1969–1976, Volume IX, Vietnam, October 1972–January 1973 (September 16)
  5. 1969–1976, Volume X, Vietnam, January 1973–July 1975 (September 23)
  6. 1969–1976, Volume XXXII, SALT I, 1969–1972 (November 5)

This last item – SALT I – is where the U.S. began to disarm while the Soviets built up armament.  Kissinger helped negotiate this treaty.

Bookmark this site – and dig in.

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: